More Information About Biochar

 

 

Supporting Articles
The following articles and websites provide additional information about biochar.

A great place to start learning about biochar, with many links to information and resources.
Biochar.org
http://www.biochar.org/

CNN report on biochar research at the University of Georgia featuring Brian Bibens, Christoph Steiner, and K. C. Das.
http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science/03/30/biochar.warming.energy/index.html

Cornell University’s main page for biochar information.
“Biochar: the new frontier”
http://www.css.cornell.edu/faculty/lehmann/index.html

National Geographic delves into the future of agriculture and how biochar can solve world soil degradation by dramatically increasing soil viability.
“Our Good Earth: The future rests on the soil beneath our feet”
http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/09/soil/mann-text/7

Geotimes gives a brief history of terra preta and discusses how char works as a soil amendment, and the opportunities for carbon sequestration.
“Charcoal: Out of the Grill and into the Ground”
http://www.geotimes.org/july08/article.html?id=trends.html

An Australian study showed char-amended soils that doubled and even tripled crop growth.
“Research confirms biochar in soils boosts crop yields”
http://biopact.com/2007/06/research-confirms-biochar-in-soils.html

A discussion of the history and possibilities for terra preta.
“Terra Preta: Black is the New Green”
http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/004815.html

A scholarly paper from Cornell University. Abstract: “At best, common renewable energy strategies can only offset fossil fuel emissions of CO2 – they cannot reverse climate change. One promising approach to lowering CO2 in the atmosphere while producing energy is biochar bio-energy, based on low-temperature pyrolysis.”
“Bio-energy in the black”
http://www.css.cornell.edu/faculty/lehmann/publ/FrontiersEcolEnv%205,%20...

“The International Biochar Initiative”
http://www.biochar-international.org/

PlentyMag article about “an ancient technique for enriching soil with charcoal that fixes carbon for millennia.”
“Farming with biochar could produce better crops and combat climate change”
http://www.plentymag.com/features/2008/08/smoking_grass.php

Scientific American discusses how runoff containing excess nitrogen from fertilizer is creating dead zones in U.S. waterways.
“Fertilizer Runoff Overwhelms Streams and Rivers--Creating Vast "Dead Zones"
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=fertilizer-runoff-overwhelms-streams

The Stanford University News Service reports on a study linking agricultural runoff to the vast “dead zone” in the ocean.
“Ocean ecosystems plagued by agricultural runoff”
http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2005/march16/gulf-030905.html

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